Call for Programs

 

Join Us for #CACUSS20!

THE CALL FOR PROPOSALS AND CALL FOR REVIEWERS IS NOW OPEN {CLICK HERE}

SUBMIT YOUR PROGRAM PROPOSAL BEFORE DECEMBER 31, 2019!

Reviewer Sign Up Keycode CACUSS20

Sunday, May 31, 2020 - Wednesday, June 3, 2020  |  TORONTO, ON |  Delta Hotels by Marriott Toronto Airport & Conference Centre

IMPORTANT DATES:

October 11, 2019

Call for Programs
(Concurrent Sessions, Big Ideas)
& Call for Reviewers Open

December 31, 2019

Call for all Programs & Reviewers Closes

January 6, 2020

Reviewers Assigned

January 20, 2020

Reviewer Deadline

January 27, 2020

Final Reviews

February 3, 2020

Program Notifications

February 17, 2019

Program Announced

May 31 - June 3, 2020

CACUSS 2020

 

Dates are subject to change

*As part of the organization’s ongoing efforts towards accessibility and inclusivity, all presenters are expected to comply with MINIMUM ACCESSIBILITY EXPECTATIONS.  More information on these expectations will be shared with successful submissions in March 2020.

CONCURRENT SESSION TYPES (60, 90 Minute Sessions, Poster Sessions & Big Ideas Sessions)

For 2020, members are encouraged to submit proposals for either 60 or 90 minute sessions. These sessions can be offered in any format (i.e. lecture, roundtable discussion, storytelling) that fits within the time frame and which allows participants to best engage with the desired learning outcomes. When completing a session description, please describe the anticipated format and how participants might expect to take part, e.g. listening, discussing, sharing, active participation in an activity, etc. 

 

Poster Presentation

Posters afford an opportunity to display research, programs or initiatives through a visual medium and engage colleagues in one-on-one dialogue. Poster should be designed to present information in a visual format that is easy to digest and which stimulates thought and further exploration. Presenter(s) should be available to present their poster presentation on Monday, June 1 and posters will remain in the showcase until end of the day on Tuesday, June 2.

Big Ideas: Powered by Pecha Kucha 

For MORE information around this exciting program, please visit the BIG IDEAS page on our conference website!

Big Ideas is powered by Pecha Kucha, a unique presentation format during which the speaker’s 20 slides auto-advance every 20 seconds. This creates a dynamic presentation that explores different aspects of the conference theme in an innovative way from a variety of voices within the Canadian student affairs profession.

Tips to Remember as you Prepare your Proposal

Successful proposals are those that capture the essence of your initiative, research or seminal ideas in very few words while succinctly explaining how you plan to engage session participants in exploring core concepts and new information.  The Program Committee will also accept proposals that achieve balance across the conference program on a range of topics and perspectives that represent the depth and breadth of our organization’s membership, emerging issues, regional and national interests, and institutional demographics. 

Do not use this forum as an opportunity to sell an idea or product.

Plan ahead.  Take advantage of the early call period to develop your ideas, engage with colleagues you plan to co-present with, and begin assembling your ideas.  A well-developed proposal is a well-presented program.  Write your program proposal in advance and copy and paste it into the online submission form.  This will allow you to work through the details of your program over time.  It also enables you to spell check your work before submitting your proposal.  Remember that points are allocated to “Organization” which includes spelling, grammar and thoroughness. This 2020 PLANNING TEMPLATE will help you get started and provides some tips and recommendations to consider as you plan your 2020 submission.

Ensure your session reflects your full consideration of issues of inclusivity, equity and accommodation.  If your proposal is accepted we will be requesting that you provide materials that you will be using during your presentation such as power point slides, handouts, Prezi links in advance as some conference attendees will want to review them before the presentation in order to fully participate.

Remember that all sessions should be designed for both attendees and presenters to learn from interactive exchange. Engaging your audience is one of the most critical aspects of a successful presentation, so don’t forget to include specific strategies for building interactivity during your session. Consider the following:

Clearly articulate intended learning outcomes—the specific knowledge to be acquired as a result of attending your session. You can use this LEARNING OUTCOMES DEVELOPMENT GUIDE as a tool for developing your outcomes. 

Understand the CACUSS COMPETENCY MODEL and work on your own COMPETENCY SKILL LEVELS.

Engaging your audience is one of the most critical aspects of a successful presentation, so don’t forget to include specific strategies for building interactivity during your session.

Develop a handout or resource for your audience to take with them.

Consider Inclusivity and Accessibility (see steps to writing a successful conference proposal below).

Consider participating in one of our CONFERENCE STREAMS this year.

Steps to Writing a Successful Conference Proposal

Here are some tips that can aid your proposal in gaining reviewer attention:

  1. Read the Call for Proposals carefully.  It is recommended that you write your submission on a document (e.g. Word, Google Docs) and copy and paste into the form when you are ready.
  2. Ask yourself a few basic questions:
    • Who might attend your session?
    • Which format might best serve to highlight key themes, engage participants, and convey meaningful new information?
    • What are the core outcomes that you hope to achieve during your session?  Do you want to gain new insights from participants that will inform further development of an idea or new approach?  Do you want to share lessons learned and key learning with attendees?  Are you grappling with a new concept or idea that you would like to share with others?
  3. Brainstorm with potential co-presenters or colleagues.
    • Determine the three or more takeaways that you want participants to learn and comprehend.
    • Identify creative strategies for accomplishing these takeaways.
    • Think about how you might effectively involve participants in your session.
    • Consider how you might continue the conversation after the conference.
  4. Use the PROGRAM REVIEW RUBRIC as a guide to ensure you are including all aspects necessary for a successful proposal.
  5. Ask an experienced presenter and/or colleague to provide feedback on your draft.
  6. Submit your proposal by the deadline!

Ensuring Your Presentation is Accessible for Everyone

One of the guiding principles of the CACUSS Program Committee is to provide accessible and inclusive conference content, so as to meet the diverse needs of all delegates. Please consider the following accessibility guidelines as you prepare your program:

If your proposal is accepted we will be requesting that you provide materials that you will be using during your presentation such as PowerPoint slides, handouts and Prezi links in advance as some conference attendees will want to review them before the presentation in order to fully participate. Some recommendations to ensure accessibility of PowerPoint and Prezi presentations include:

Simple design: plain background, limited text and visually stimulating

High colour contrast between foreground and background

The largest font possible (minimum of 16pt)

Avoid busy patterns in the background

Avoid clutter with too much text, images or both

It is a good idea to make a text-only version of PowerPoint and Prezi slides to make it easier to access the information using adaptive technology and convert to other formats.

During the session, presenters should verbally describe the content of videos or any written materials, including overheads or chalkboard notes for those audience members with vision loss

Consider the activities that are included in your presentation and strategies for adapting the activities to accommodate all participants. For example, events that require standing for long periods of time (i.e. meet and greet events) may not be welcoming to persons who use scooters or who cannot stand for extended periods.

Anticipate audience diversity when preparing. People may have different cultural, ethnic, religious or racial backgrounds, be of different ages, genders and sexual orientations, and have a range of disabilities whether visible or not. When writing, speaking, or using images, use examples that reflect the diversity of identities and perspectives.

Descriptors that refer to personal attributes such as race, gender, sexual orientation, disability or age, for example, tend to over-emphasize and draw undue attention to the distinguishing attribute. Avoid the use of descriptors unless they are relevant and valid.

Inclusive language strives to promote all people, regardless of difference, as full and valued members of society by selecting vocabulary that avoids exclusion, the use of false stereotypes, and the use of descriptors that portray groups of certain people as dependent, powerless or less valued than others.

For more information, please see MINIMUM EXPECTATIONS OF CONFERENCE PRESENTERS

Preparing an Effective Big Ideas Presentation

CACUSS Big Ideas: Powered by PechaKucha is a unique presentation format during which the speaker’s 20 slides auto-advance every 20 seconds. This creates a dynamic presentation that explores different aspects of the conference theme in an innovative way from a variety of voices within the Canadian student affairs profession. For more information about PechaKucha, please visit http://www.pechakucha.org.

Some Guidelines for your slides for Big Ideas:

  • Simple design: plain background, limited text and visually stimulating
  • High colour contrast between foreground and background
  • No font, image only
  • Avoid busy patterns in the background
  • Avoid clutter with too much text, images or both

Preparing an Effective Poster Presentation

Poster presentations showcase research or institutional programs in a format that engages colleagues in informal dialogue one-on-one.  Information is conveyed in various ways, incorporating signs, graphs, posters and/or material presented on a laptop computer.  Posters are designed to present content and visuals in a manner that is easy to digest and stimulates thought and further exploration.  An effective poster presentation addresses a central theme, presents relevant and useful information, and stimulates discussion. ***Posters will remain in the showcase for TWO days - Monday, June 1 and Tuesday, June 2***

Some tips for developing effective poster presentations include:

  • Display - Prepare a display that captures your central topic and ideas in easily understood printed text and graphics, ensuring that you include a title, institution name/logo, relevant (brief) details and visuals. As conference attendees visit your display, you will have the opportunity to discuss your poster topic with them. 
  • Oral Remarks - Prepare a few remarks that will welcome participants to your poster. Introductions are in order. Find out who they are, where they work, and why your poster is of interest to them. A short introduction of about 1 - 2 minutes can give an overview of your poster and begin the conversation. These conversations can be very interactive, and accompanied by live or recorded demonstrations of tools/projects and/or websites that provide more detailed information.
  • Handouts and Web Site - Prepare a one-page handout that summarizes your poster and includes contact information, a URL if applicable, and a list of additional resources that provide more extensive or in-depth information beyond what is available on the poster itself
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  • SUBMIT YOUR 2020 CONFERENCE PROPOSAL TODAY