Call for Programs

 

Join Us for SEA CHANGE 2018!

Sunday, June 17 2018 - Wednesday, June 20 2018  |  Charlottetown, PEI  |  PEI Convention Centre

CLICK HERE for the  FINAL CONCURRENT SESSIONS

Thanks for your submissions!

The Association of Registrars of the Universities and Colleges in Canada (ARUCC) and the Canadian Association of College and University Student Services (CACUSS) come together for the first time to jointly host Sea Change 2018 in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

This year’s program presents a unique opportunity for members of CACUSS and ARUCC to blur the lines of their thinking and practice, and explore the knowledge and experiences of our professional partners.  

For more information about the 2018 conference, please click here for a message from the CACUSS & ARUCC Conference Co-Chairs. 

IMPORTANT DATES

November 9, 2017

Call for Programs (Concurrent Sessions, Big Ideas)
& Call for Reviewers Open

January 5, 2018

Call for Reviewers Closes

January 19, 2018

Call for all Programs Closes

January 29, 2018

Reviewers Assigned

January 30, 2018

WEBINAR: Peer Reviewing ARUCC & CACUSS Conference Proposals 

February 12, 2018

Reviewer Deadline

February 19, 2018

Final Reviews

March 2, 2018

Program Notifications

March 19, 2018

Program Announced

April 10, 2018

WEBINAR: Presenting at the 2018 ARUCC & CACUSS Conference 

June 17 - June 20, 2018

 SEA CHANGE 2018 Conference

 

Dates are subject to change

*As part of the organization’s ongoing efforts towards accessibility and inclusivity, all presentations must be received in advance of the conference.   More information on technology requirements will be shared with successful program applicants in March.

CONCURRENT SESSION TYPES (30, 60, 120 Minutes)

TYPE DESCRIPTION
Arts Based Session                                              Presenters address current issues in Student Affairs and Services through arts-based mediums such as film, poetry, art, video, or other expressive forms.
Campfire Session               The goal of a campfire session is the creation of an open forum in which the attendees generate the majority of the discussion and knowledge sharing. Presenters launch the discussion with a short (maximum 20 minutes) presentation from an individual or a group and then move into a facilitator role, inviting responses to comments and questions from those around the room and letting the audience dictate the ultimate direction of the conversation. Campfire sessions allow for the sharing of experiences from multiple perspectives on the same topic.
Debate Two or more debaters present clearly differing points of view as they exchange insights on a topic of import to Student Affairs & Services. The interaction should be moderated by a chairperson with a prepared set of questions and time for questions from the audience.
Demonstration Demonstrations show audience members how a tool, process, or product works. Vendors who are considering a demonstration are encouraged to partner with institutions who use their product to present.
Expert Lecture Expert Lectures are formal presentations by an expert in the field and/or subject area consisting of a lecture and question period with the audience.
Panel Multiple speakers focusing on one issue for a maximum duration of 60 minutes, including questions for each speaker as well as introductory and closing remarks if needed. The submitter is responsible for coordinating the panel presentations in advance.
Research Presentation Research presentations report on original research that relates to the field and/or conference theme. Research presentations may be presented individually, with co-presenters, or as a panel presentation.
Round Table Discussion A Roundtable is a group discussion on a precise theme seated around a table. Roundtable presentations typically include a short (5-10) minute presentation by the presenter to introduce the topic, followed by discussion and feedback from participants. Roundtable presenters should bring targeted questions to pose to participants at the table and allocate time to summarize and conclude on the subject at the end of the session.
Sounding Board The Sounding Board is a unique session to provide attendees an opportunity to present very briefly ideas or projects in very early stages and to then receive feedback from the audience.  If you have an idea you are considering or one that is in an early stage of development, consider presenting it here.
Storytelling Storytelling presentations share the authentic experience of an individual, team, community, or initiative. For example, a story session could involve a story of a successful or less than successful initiative, program, or approach in Student Affairs & Services. A story could also describe the challenges faced and overcome when strategic planning and policy is put into action.
Workshop Presenters provide an introduction and then host a participatory activity where participants can learn new skills, procedures, etc.
Alternative Session Type The Program Committee is actively seeking proposals for innovative session types contributing to a program that is informative and invigorating and, additionally, that exposes the audience to new ways of disseminating, connecting with, and learning about key topics.  This format applies to any submission falling outside the types described above due to novelty in format or style.

Additional Concurrent Session Types

Poster Presentation

Opportunity to display research, programs or initiatives through a visual medium and engage colleagues in one-on-one dialogue. Poster should be designed to present information in a visual format that is easy to digest and which stimulates thought and further exploration. Presenter(s) should be available to present their poster presentation on Monday, June 18 and posters will remain in the showcase until end of the day on Tuesday, June 19.

Big Ideas: Powered by Pecha Kucha 

Big Ideas is powered by Pecha Kucha, a unique presentation format during which the speaker’s 20 slides auto-advance every 20 seconds. This creates a dynamic presentation that explores different aspects of the conference theme in an innovative way from a variety of voices within the Canadian student affairs profession.

See http://www.cacuss.ca/conference/Big_Ideas_.html 

Tips to Remember as you Prepare your Proposal

Successful proposals are those that capture the essence of your initiative, research or seminal ideas in very few words while succinctly explaining how you plan to engage session participants in exploring core concepts and new information.  The Program Committee will also accept proposals that achieve balance across the conference program on a range of topics and perspectives that represent the depth and breadth of our organization’s membership, emerging issues, regional and national interests, and institutional demographics. 

Do not use the forum as an opportunity to sell an idea or product.

Plan ahead.  Take advantage of the early call period to develop your ideas, engage with colleagues you plan to co-present with, and begin assembling your ideas.  A well-developed proposal is a well-presented program.  Write your program proposal in advance and copy and paste it into the online submission form.  This will allow you to work through the details of your program over time.  It also enables you to spell check your work before submitting your proposal.  Remember that points are allocated to “Organization” which includes spelling, grammar and thoroughness. This Planning Guide/Template will help you get started.

Ensure your session reflects your full consideration of issues of inclusivity, equity and accommodation.  If your proposal is accepted we will be requesting that you provide materials that you will be using during your presentation such as power point slides, handouts, Prezi links in advance as some conference attendees will want to review them before the presentation in order to fully participate.

Remember that all sessions should be designed for both attendees and presenters to learn from interactive exchange. Engaging your audience is one of the most critical aspects of a successful presentation, so don’t forget to include specific strategies for building interactivity during your session. Consider the following:

Clearly articulate intended learning outcomes—the specific knowledge to be acquired as a result of attending your session. You can use this Learning Outcomes Development Guide as a tool for developing your outcomes 

Understand the difference between Competencies and Learning Outcomes

Engaging your audience is one of the most critical aspects of a successful presentation, so don’t forget to include specific strategies for building interactivity during your session.

Develop a handout or resource for your audience to take with them.

Consider Inclusivity and Accessibility (see steps to writing a successful conference proposal).

Steps to Writing a Successful Conference Proposal

Successful proposals are those that capture the essence of your initiative, research or seminal ideas in very few words while succinctly explaining how you plan to engage session participants in exploring core concepts and new information.  The Program Committee will also accept proposals that achieve balance across the conference program on a range of topics and perspectives that represent the depth and breadth of our organization’s membership, emerging issues, regional and national interests and institutional demographics.

Here are some tips that can aid your proposal in gaining reviewer attention:

  1. Read the Call for Proposals carefully.  It is recommended that you write your submission on a document (e.g. Word, Google Docs) and copy and paste into the form when you are ready.
  2. Ask yourself a few basic questions:
    • Who might attend your session?
    • Which format might best serve to highlight key themes, engage participants, and convey meaningful new information?
    • What are the core outcomes that you hope to achieve during your session?  Do you want to gain new insights from participants that will inform further development of an idea or new approach?  Do you want to share lessons learned and key learning with attendees?  Are you grappling with a new concept or idea that you would like to share with others?
  3. Brainstorm with potential co-presenters or colleagues.
    • Determine the three or more takeaways that you want participants to learn and comprehend.
    • Identify creative strategies for accomplishing these takeaways.
    • Think about how you might effectively involve participants in your session.
    • Consider how you might continue the conversation after the conference.
  4. Use the Program Review Rubric as a guide to ensure you are including all aspects necessary for a successfully proposal.
  5. Ask an experienced presenter and/or colleague to provide feedback on your draft.
  6. Submit your proposal by the deadline!

Ensuring Your Presentation is Accessible for Everyone

One of the guiding principles of the CACUSS Program Committee is to provide accessible and inclusive conference content, so as to meet the diverse needs of all delegates. Please consider the following accessibility guidelines as you prepare your program:

If your proposal is accepted we will be requesting that you provide materials that you will be using during your presentation such as PowerPoint slides, handouts and Prezi links in advance as some conference attendees will want to review them before the presentation in order to fully participate. Some recommendations to ensure accessibility of PowerPoint and Prezi presentations include:

Simple design: plain background, limited text and visually stimulating

High colour contrast between foreground and background

The largest font possible (minimum of 16pt)

Avoid busy patterns in the background

Avoid clutter with too much text, images or both

It is a good idea to make a text-only version of PowerPoint and Prezi slides to make it easier to access the information using adaptive technology and convert to other formats.

During the session, presenters should verbally describe the content of videos or any written materials, including overheads or chalkboard notes for those audience members with vision loss

Consider the activities that are included in your presentation and strategies for adapting the activities to accommodate all participants. For example, events that require standing for long periods of time (i.e. meet and greet events) may not be welcoming to persons who use scooters or who cannot stand for extended periods.

Anticipate audience diversity when preparing. People may have different cultural, ethnic, religious or racial backgrounds, be of different ages, genders and sexual orientations, and have a range of disabilities whether visual or not. When writing, speaing, or using images, use examples that reflect the diversity of identities and perspectives.

Descriptors that refer to personal attributes such as race, gender, sexual orientation, disability or age, for example, tend to over-emphasize and draw undue attention to the distinguishing attribute. Avoid the use of descriptors unless they are relevant and valid.

Inclusive language strives to promote all people, regardless of difference, as full and valued members of society by selecting vocabulary that avoids exclusion, the use of false stereotypes, and the use of descriptors that portray groups of certain people as dependent, powerless or less valued than others.

For more information, please see Minimum Expectations of CACUSS Presenters, a document shared by former host Carleton University.

Preparing an Effective Big Ideas Presentation

CACUSS Big Ideas: Powered by PechaKucha is a unique presentation format during which the speaker’s 20 slides auto-advance every 20 seconds. This creates a dynamic presentation that explores different aspects of the conference theme in an innovative way from a variety of voices within the Canadian student affairs profession. For more information about PechaKucha, please visit http://www.pechakucha.org.

Some Guidelines for your slides for Big Ideas for PowerPoint:

  • Simple design: plain background, limited text and visually stimulating
  • High colour contrast between foreground and background
  • The largest font possible (a minimum of 16pt)
  • Avoid busy patterns in the background
  • Avoid clutter with too much text, images or both

Preparing an Effective Poster Presentation

Poster presentations showcase research or institutional programs in a format that engages colleagues in informal dialogue one-on-one.  Information is conveyed in various ways, incorporating signs, graphs, posters and/or material presented on a laptop computer.  Posters are designed to present content and visuals in a manner that is easy to digest and stimulates thought and further exploration.  An effective poster presentation addresses a central theme, presents relevant and useful information, and stimulates discussion. ***Posters will remain in the showcase for TWO days - Monday, June 18 and Tuesday, June 19***

Some tips for developing effective poster presentations include:

  • Display - Prepare a display that captures your central topic and ideas in easily understood printed text and graphics, ensuring that you include a title, institution name/logo, relevant (brief) details and visuals. As conference attendees visit your display, you will have the opportunity to discuss your poster topic with them. 
  • Oral Remarks - Prepare a few remarks that will welcome participants to your poster. Introductions are in order. Find out who they are, where they work, and why your poster is of interest to them. A short introduction of about 1 - 2 minutes can give an overview of your poster and begin the conversation. These conversations can be very interactive, and accompanied by live or recorded demonstrations of tools/projects and/or websites that provide more detailed information.
  • Handouts and Web Site - Prepare a one-page handout that summarizes your poster and includes contact information, a URL if applicable, and a list of additional resources that provide more extensive or in-depth information beyond what is available on the poster itself
  •  
  • Reviewing Conference Proposals

  • Reviewer applications are now closed!